Father making biscuits with his two daughters in the kitchen of their home.
Feb
2
2018

The Family Cooking Kitchen Playbook

Is your family busy prepping their best TV-watching treats for Super Bowl Sunday tomorrow? If you need inspo, we’ve got particularly Game Day­-worthy nacho and chicken drumstick recipes.

But all this Super Bowl talk of teamwork and solid coaching got us thinking that these skills aren’t just important on the football field, but in the kitchen, too.

There are tons of benefits to getting the whole family together in the kitchen to help make meals. Kids who cook are often healthier and less picky eaters. But with kitchen space at a premium, the idea of being able to get the whole family cooking in the kitchen together without everyone tripping all over each other can seem a bit overwhelming. The key to family kitchen success: know what position you’re playing.

Which brings us back to our football analogy: give each family member a kitchen position to play for smooth, interference-free meal prep plays!

The Coach
This is going to be whichever family member does the most cooking. (Let’s be real: this is probably going to be Mom or Dad.) The Coach decides the game plan (what recipes you’re going to use) and dictates the different plays (who’s doing what in the kitchen at any given time).

The Running Back
On the field, a Running Back’s jobs are to catch passes and receive handoffs from the Quarterback. In the kitchen … it’s the same thing! When another team member needs a particular ingredient or kitchen, ask your Running Back. This fetch-and-carry job is a great position for younger kids who aren’t ready to handle more complex chopping or cooking tasks; just make sure anything they have to carry isn’t too heavy or on a shelf that’s too high up!

The Quarterback
In football, the Quarterback is often seen as the team leader by the players on the field, so in the kitchen, it makes sense to give your Quarterback the most labour-intensive tasks, or the tasks with the most responsibility – basically, the “grown-up” jobs. (E.g., manning the stove, chopping veggies, and putting things in the oven.) Since these are jobs that may involve sharp tools and hot surfaces, this is a good position for Mom or Dad, or responsible older kids.

Now we just need to figure out a game plan for post-meal clean-up!

How do you get your family to help out with meal prep? Let us know over on the Zabiha Halal Facebook Page!

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